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Can you feel it?

For some, it is the mark of a New Year.  For others, it is a night of dressing up into costume, pretending, laughing, and eating candy to play with the spirits who have crossed a thin veil, gaining access to our world.  My favorite night of the year slowly arrives with the promise of interesting times – Halloween draws near and many are tending to last minute details to enjoy its presence to the fullest.  To help get things started, here is a little narrative by William Shakespeare.

Thrice the brinded cat hath mew’d.

Thrice and once, the hedge-pic whin’d.
Harpier cries: – ’tis-time ’tis-time!
Round about the cauldron go;
In the poison’d entrails throw. –
Toad, that under cold stone,
Days and night has thirty-one;
Swelter’d venom sleeping got,

Boil thou first i’ the charmed pot!

Double, double toil and trouble;

Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog;
Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg, and owlet’s wing,-
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
Double, double toil and trouble;

Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Scale of dragon; tooth of wolf;
Witches’ mummy; maw and gulf
Of the ravin’d salt-sea shark;
Root of hemlock digg’d i the dark;
Liver of blaspheming Jew;
Gall of goat, and slips of yew
Sliver’d in the moon’s eclipse;
Nose of Turk, and Tartar’s lips;
Finger of birth-strangled babe
Ditch deliver’d by a drab, – 
Make the gruel thick and slab:
Add thereto a tiger’s chaudron,

For the indrediants of our cauldron.

Double, double toil and trouble;

Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

Cool it with a baboon’s blood;

Then the charm is firm and good.

The Witches’ Spell
Act IV, Scene 1 from Macbeth (1606)

by William Shakespeare

Pretty juicy huh?  Leave it to Mr. Shakespeare to liven things up a little.  More to come… for now, I have to tend to some jack-o-lanterns.
Until then…
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